Out and About at Gorse Hill

April and May Catch Up.  After the really cold March weather all our normal signs of Spring were delayed.  Our first Sunday opening in April was entitled ‘Signs of Spring’ and our walk struggled to find very much other than some frog spawn and a few green shoots.

Scarlet Elfcup
Photo by Su Haselton

 

Colour appeared mid to late April and this Scarlet Elfcup (Sarcoscypha austriaca) fungi appeared in several woodlands.

 

 

Daffodil Walk in late April
Photo by Su Haselton

 

 

 

The daffodils suddenly also came through and put on a great show down ‘Daffodil Walk’ to the Heritage Orchard.

 

 

 

Wild Cherry
Photo by Su Haselton

 

 

 

 

Fruit also started to form on the Wild Cherry trees, this photo was taken in our car park.

 

 

Male Orange Tip Butterfly
Photo by Su Haselton

 

 

Early May is a good time to see Orange Tip butterflies and they have been abundant this year.  Usually they do not settle very long so this photo was a lucky shot!

 

 

Dawn Chorus – first rays
Photo by Su Haselton

 

 

Our Dawn Chorus event was held on 19 May.  A dozen of us joined up with Graham at 3.45am to hear the first birds start to sing.  It quickly began to get light and, as we reached the Outcrop Track, the first rays of warm sunshine broke through.  We recorded a total of 36 species with plenty of Blackcaps singing in all our woodlands.  In adjacent farmland we spotted 2 Grey Partridge, a really endangered species. As we were returning to Cabin Wood we were treated to the sight of a Tawny Owl with its breakfast in its talons!  We finished our walk looking around Cabin Wood whilst our breakfast was cooking – bacon barms were very welcome.

Mown Path 5 Acre Meadow
Photo by Su Haselton

 

The meadow grasses and wildflowers have really started to grow now the weather has warmed up after the cold and wet.  Our 5 Acre meadow is accessible to the public from our car park and from Cabin Wood and we have just cut the first paths through the grass and, although it is currently a ‘sea of yellow buttercups’, some vetch and red clover are beginning to flower as is the ragged robin by the pond.

 

 

Bug Hotel in 5 Acre
Photo by Su Haselton

 

 

 

 

Our ‘pillar’ bug hotels are in nice sunny spots in the 5 Acre meadow and there is certainly an abundance of insect life to be found.

 

5 Acre Pond
Photo by Su Haselton

 

 

 

The 5 Acre meadow pond is also looking good with the fluffy heads of reed mace circling the pond and wildflowers beginning to flower.  Damsel and dragonflies have also appeared now the sun is shining at both this pond and at Seldom Pond in Cabin Wood so there is plenty to look out for when you visit.

 

 

(23.5.18)

 

A very cold March day.  The ‘beast from the east’ and ‘storm Emma’ didn’t deposit a lot of snow in our area, certainly compared to much of the country, but temperatures fell below zero, freezing our ponds and creating some winter scenes.   Here are some photos taken on Saturday morning 3 March.

Seldom Pond Picnic Area
Photo by Su Haselton

 

 

 

 

 

Seldom Pond Boardwalk
Photo by Su Haselton

 

 

 

 

 

Frozen Seldom Pond
Photo by Su Haselton

 

 

 

 

 

 

Boardwalk Cabin Wood
Photo by Su Haselton

 

 

 

 

 

Snowdrop Walk
Photo by Su Haselton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Frozen 5 Acre Pond
Photo by Su Haselton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Icy Marl Pit Pond
Photo by Su Haselton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Habitat Hotel Bluebell Wood
Photo by Su Haselton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(4.3.18)

 

 

Three early events for 2018.  We held our annual winter pruning days on 27th January and 3 February.

Rain stopped at least
Photo by Su Haselton

 

 

 

Unfortunately it rained both days but it was not too heavy to prevent us pruning the whole of the Heritage Orchard.  We thank Paul from the Northern Fruit Group for his help and guidance as well as our volunteers and visitors who took part.

Early daffodils in January
Photo by Su Haselton

 

 

As a bonus to brighten the dull days daffodils are flowering in Daffodil Walk leading down to the orchard.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Great Twin Pond Dig:

Slide show
Photo by Su Haselton

 

Helen Greaves is part of the UCL (University College London) Pond Restoration Research Group.  This group  uses scientific research to underpin practical pond conservation and restoration action, especially in agricultural landscapes.

Helen is currently completing her PhD research which aims to assess the value of pond management for biodiversity conservation.  Her work focuses on macroinvertebrate community assemblages and water chemistry analysis.

 

The ‘Great Twin Pond Dig’ is twinning the ponds of North Norfolk with those of West Lancashire – two areas of the UK that are rich in “marl pit” ponds. This project trials  “Adopt a Pond” approach idea and has the aim of re-connecting people and farmers with their local farmland ponds and with pond ecology and restoration and also explore new ways of getting people to interact with aquatic biodiversity.

 

 

Off we go to see Helen’s project ponds
Photo by Su Haselton

 

Helen advertised her project in local media and her talk was staged at our Information Cabin at the Reserve on 17th February.  Following her entertaining and interesting explanation of the project and early scientific results we walked through the Reserve to the adjoining farmland where the marl pits had been cleared.

 

 

 

Helen explaining her work
Photo by Su Haselton

 

 

The walk was extremely muddy in places but we all  arrived safely and gathered as Helen explained the clearance, on-going monitoring and controls.

 

Looking across to an uncleared marl pit
Photo by Su Haselton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Snowdrop Sunday

Path leading to Cabin Wood
Photo by Su Haselton

 

 

The wet and windy weather abated for our Snowdrop Sunday on 18th February and the sun did make an appearance.  We opened at 12 noon and the cafe was soon busy with visitors.  Over 100 visitors came that afternoon.

 

 

Signs show snowdrop walk
Photo by Su Haselton

 

 

 

The snowdrop path was clearly signposted for visitors

 

 

 

 

 

 

Enjoying the view
Photo by Su Haselton

 

 

but there is always more to see in any walk through Cabin Wood

 

 

 

Visitors in Cabin Wood
Photo by Su Haselton

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fungi
Photo by Su Haselton

 

 

 

 

Strange shapes
Photo by Su Haselton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More to see than snowdrops
Photo by Su Haselton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Snowdrops for sale
Photo by Su Haselton

 

 

We also had some snowdrops for sale as visitors usually want some to take home.

We hope all our visitors had an enjoyable afternoon and will come back to see us soon.

 

 

 

(21.2.18)

 

A view from the skies.  Stratus Imagery Aerial Photography have shared this sunset video at Gorse Hill taken on 7 January.  If you have been on some of our Sunday walks across the Reserve can you recognise where these images are taken?  These are views across North Meadow, North Wood and Margaret’s Meadow.  You can see more images on our Twitter feed, the link is on the Home Page.

(9.1.18)

Comments are closed.